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Burning Recycling

April 13, 2010
tags:

Anyone hear that the recycling in Ft Myers is being burned?

I heard it on Fox News Channel 4, about five nights ago.

It is only the city of Fort Myers, not the surrounding areas.

All recycling in that area for the last year has been burned, not recycled.

I put a call into city public works last week concerning this and my call was returned today.

I was promised that they were going to change their policy as of today.

Thanks goes to various local news channels. Your reporting corrected this problem.

And thanks for the call back from the city.

Here are some links. todays news   http://www.fox4now.com/Global/story.asp?S=12299017

http://www.nbc-2.com/global/story.asp?s=12286082

Here’s whats ironic, The City of Fort Myers puts out a flyers and internet web site that says this:

Recycling plastic saves twice as much energy as burning it in an incinerator.

www.cityftmyers.com

I now live outside city limits. I am so glad our recycling has been properly handled all along.

I make a great effort to make sure everything that can be recycled is.

I found out a few tips today.

1.    Containers don’t need to be rinsed out all the way as this will waste water and it is cleaned at facility.
Just rinse them out good enough that they don’t draw insects to your home.
2.    Plastic bags just get caught in the machines, they are not recycled by facility.
You need to take them to local grocery stores.
3.   Styrofoam is not recycled at any facility.

It cost tax payers more money because it takes up time to sort and throw away.

Take peanuts to your local UPS store.

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Name this place?

April 13, 2010

Name this place?

This is whats left over when a development goes bankrupt.

Five years later.

You can see the patches of trees. This is what use to fill the whole place. Trees.

Oxygen giving trees and Carbon eating trees.

Swainson’s Hawk? I don’t think so.

March 28, 2010

Wind Vane?

House Guard...

How majestic that we get this noble bird to guard our homes.

I thought it was a Swainson’s Hawk till I looked at the wing. It’s just too skinny of a wing and the wrong coloring.

What do you think it is? Maybe it is just an unhealthy version? Maybe it’s just visiting the area for the winter?

Here’s a picture of its wing. I couldn’t get a better picture because it flew away when I got close.

Wing

Fire brings new life.

February 26, 2010

Hawk on a snag!

Can u see the Hawk? He’s perched way up high with plenty of view, thanks to the fire.

The fire in May of 2007 that burned more than 400 acres was a plus for the Hawk because it opened things up for a better look.

The once green leaved tree is now dead. Some may say, “Why don’t they just tear all that burned out dead stuff down?”

The answer is because life is all around. If you tear things down with a bulldozer then the birds will no longer have an easy place to hunt, the seeds that were popped open with the fire have not only sprouted but are now well established young trees that have plenty of sunlight to grow up big and strong.

The charcoal is great for the soil. The charcoal palm trees are still very much alive as you can see by the picture below.

So as sad as a fire may seem at the time, it really has a lot of benifits to the earth and it’s friends.

The perfect perch!

Life continues...

Snags and palms

Philodendron selloum (bipinnatifidum)

February 20, 2010

These are very hardy plants. You can grow more out of the babies. If you happen to break a root or two, just clip them to a nice clean cut. Then use a sharp serrated knife, or hand saw to cut through the root ball, and then separating the plant portion as much as possible. Do not cut the root ball into any more than quarters. Make sure that all of the cut roots have been cleanly cut, and then dust the cuts with a rooting hormone such as Roottone. Allow the roots to remain exposed for a couple hours to allow the cuts to callous over before repotting with a good commercial potting soil. Don’t water at all the first day, but then water very well, using the force of the water to wash down additional dirt down into the root zone.

Your new plants have been through quite a bit of shock in this procedure, so it’ll take a while before they’re looking great again. Hold off feeding until the plant has started to show signs of new growth.

Shell Rocks

February 19, 2010

I love these shell rocks.

It’s like an easter egg hunt; you never know what you will find.

It looks like someone made a mold of a shell and poured concrete into it.

Florida use to be a land mass under water except a sandbar area found in the middle of the state.

These shell rocks are proof of that. This is part of our soil.

Side note: I researched these shell rocks. 
They call them washed shell and are readily available from 
anyone that carries hardscape (landscaping material). 
I still don't understand the scientific history of them.

Shells or rocks?

February 18, 2010

So are you wondering why I have a picture of these “NOT SO PRETTY SHELLS?

This is what Village Walk uses instead of gravel.

Is this what is dug up from the lakes?

My guess is that it is.

These shells are under our houses.

Does anyone have any good stories about this? I would love to hear them.